Scotland Health Care recognizes ‘extraordinary nurse’


Staff report



Courtesy photo

Scotland Memorial Hospital registered nurse Monica Adams, left, became the first Daisy Award honoree. Presenting the award is Sherrie Moore, the hospital’s Chief Nursing Officer.


LAURINBURG — Monica Adams, a registered nurse, is Scotland Health Care System’s first DAISY Award winner.

The award goes to nurses who “consistently demonstrate excellence as outstanding role models through their clinical expertise and extraordinary compassionate care.” Nominees for the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses are nominated by patients and their families, physicians and colleagues.

“Monica Adams is an excellent nurse who provides exceptional care to each one of her patients<’ said a nominating letter. “I personally witnessed one of Monica’s patients going through a difficult time because her hospital stay was going to be much longer and difficult than expected. The patient began to become depressed. Through Monica’s own personal experience with a similar situation, Monica was able to provide reassurance and encouragement that the patient needed.”

Last year, Adams, who works in Scotland Memorial’s medical/surgical/pediatrics unit, lost her home to a fire.

“She has not let her life circumstances keep her from smiling and bringing joy to others,” the letter said. “She is deserving of so much more but, I am thankful to have her as a coworker and friend.”

The DAISY Award is part of the DAISY Foundation’s program to recognize the “superhuman” tasks nurses perform every day.

The nonprofit DAISY Foundation is based in Glen Ellen, CA, and was established by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes. Barnes died at 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. The care Barnes and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

At a presentation in front of the nurse’s colleagues, physicians, patients and visitors, honorees receive a certificate commending them for being an “Extraordinary Nurse.”

The certificate reads: “In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people.” The honorees are also given a beautiful and meaningful sculpture called “A Healer’s Touch,” hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe of Zimbabwe, Africa.

One day while Barnes was in the hospital, he asked his family to bring him a Cinnabon cinnamon roll plus enough for all the nurses in his unit. With the help of Cinnabon’s parent company, FOCUS Brands, the DAISY Foundation carries on this tradition by serving Cinnabons to all the nurses in the award recipient’s unit.

Scotland Health Care System officials say they will also carry on this tradition by offering Cinnabons to the medical/surgical/pediatrics unit.”

“Scotland Health Care System is proud to be among the hospitals participating in the DAISY Award program,” said Sherrie Moore, assistant vice president of nursing and Chief Nursing Officer. “Nurses are heroes every day, and given the current national nursing shortage, The DAISY Award plays an important role in letting our nurses know their work is highly valued.”

Courtesy photo

Scotland Memorial Hospital registered nurse Monica Adams, left, became the first Daisy Award honoree. Presenting the award is Sherrie Moore, the hospital’s Chief Nursing Officer.

http://laurinburgexchange.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0010.jpgCourtesy photo

Scotland Memorial Hospital registered nurse Monica Adams, left, became the first Daisy Award honoree. Presenting the award is Sherrie Moore, the hospital’s Chief Nursing Officer.

Staff report

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