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Last updated: July 17. 2014 8:25AM -
By Rachel McAuley rmcauley@civitasmedia.com



Professor Johnny G. Force, of Mad Science, conducted a few slimy, smoky and balloon-popping experiments to get kids excited about learning science Wednesday afternoon at Scotland County Memorial Library as part of its summer reading program.
Professor Johnny G. Force, of Mad Science, conducted a few slimy, smoky and balloon-popping experiments to get kids excited about learning science Wednesday afternoon at Scotland County Memorial Library as part of its summer reading program.
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LAURINBURG — Was it magic… or science?


There was a lot of “wild and crazy stuff” going on at the Scotland County Memorial Library Wednesday afternoon that had nearly 600 kids waving their arms wildly in the air to volunteer at the “Mad Science” show, part of the library’s summer reading program.


The children sat astonished — a few, hesitant and unsure — when “Professor Johnny G. Force,” of Mad Science, performed his first experiment by bringing three volunteers to the stage. Two girls and a boy had to switch spots while holding a cup of water on top of their heads.


After pouring the girls’ water into the boy’s cup and adding a chemical to the mix, he turned the cup upside down on the boy’s head — but no water came out.


Force explained that the chemical he used turned the water into a jelly-like substance almost instantly.


“Is there a difference between science and magic?” he asked.


A few volunteers said “science is real” and “magic is just an illusion.”


“Science tells you the secrets. In magic, you don’t reveal your secret,” he said.


Force said he loves how shocked and excited his young audience get when he makes his experiments seem dangerous. Some of his more popular experiments involved slimy substances, needles and balloons.


“I promise no one will get hurt,” he told them. “You’ll all go home with all your body parts — or most of your body parts — I think.”


Laurinburg native Kelley Eade said she brought her two children to the program because, like many kids, they’ve shown an interest in explosions and scientific experiments.


“They like to learn how things work,” she said. “It’s about getting them excited about science and having them realize that they can learn in other places other than school.”


Rachel McAuley can be reached at 910-276-2311, ext. 15. Follow her on Twitter @rachelmcauley1.


 
 
 
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